ORNL technology transfer continues strong upward trend

New methods are improving connections between private businesses and technology from Knoxville Startup Day 2014 presenting sponsor Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with 101 licenses and options executed during the last three years.

Mike Paulus, director of Technology Transfer, attributes the growth in large part to the Technology Innovation Program, Bridging the Gap and SPARK! These programs helped the lab double the number of licenses for the fiscal years 2012-2014 compared to 2009-2011, and Paulus expects a new initiative, the Invention to Innovation Webinar Series, to help maintain the upward trend.

“We have a talented staff that has worked very hard to identify, develop and market high-potential technologies that provide the best opportunities to licensees,” Paulus said. “Our two-pronged approach focuses on increasing the overall deal volume while at the same time concentrating on our most promising technologies.”

Through the Technology Innovation Program, ORNL invests about half of its royalty revenue to make promising technologies market ready. ORNL scientists and engineers propose technologies for funding and a panel of laboratory leaders and external experts select the winners based on their near-term potential for societal and economic impact.

Two technology forums, Bridging the Gap and SPARK! bring together entrepreneurs, investors, industry experts and economic development leaders to explore partnering opportunities. These conferences, hosted by ORNL, allow potential licensees to meet inventors and learn about some of ORNL’s most promising technologies and capabilities. The next SPARK! is planned for spring 2015.

Read the news release here.

Source: Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Mayor Madeline Rogero attends mayors conference on entrepreneurship

Mayor Madeline Rogero joined mayors from around the nation last week at the second annual Mayors Conference on Entrepreneurship in Louisville, Kentucky.

With a focus on “Making an Entrepreneurial City,” mayors and entrepreneurship experts discussed ways to promote startup activity and encourage higher levels of entrepreneurship in their cities.  Christi Branscom, Deputy to the Mayor and Chief Operating Officer for the City of Knoxville, joined Mayor Rogero.

The 2014 Mayors Conference on Entrepreneurship: Making an Entrepreneurial City explored the growing “Maker Movement.” As more and more Americans have access to both the technologies to build things and the networks to learn new skills, creativity is being channeled into new business ventures, economically benefiting both the maker-entrepreneur and others in the community. Not only that, but “Making” has the potential to transform manufacturing and thereby American cities. This year’s event addressed:

  • The Maker Movement and ways to harness this activity,
  • Making and how it applies to advanced manufacturing,
  • The importance of immigrant entrepreneurs and initiatives to welcome them, and
  • Practical strategies to grow and promote the entrepreneurial economy of cities.

“Knoxville already has a strong Maker community, and we have great regional resources at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee,” Mayor Rogero said. “By connecting those resources with entrepreneurial efforts, including the Knoxville Entrepreneur Center, we can really put East Tennessee on the map as a hub of innovation.”

The program’s keynote speaker was Dale Dougherty, president and CEO of Maker Media, Inc., and founder of MAKE magazine. Attending mayors also heard from panelists who are experts in entrepreneurship, technology and manufacturing innovation and engagement of immigrant entrepreneurs.

The conference was convened by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, a private, nonpartisan foundation that aims to foster economic independence by advancing educational achievement and entrepreneurial success, in partnership with Mayor Greg Fischer of Louisville. The Kauffman Foundation covered all expenses of the trip.

“The mayors attending this conference understand how important entrepreneurs are to economic growth, job creation and innovation,” said Jason Wiens, policy director at the Kauffman Foundation. “The conference is designed to help them learn from experts and each other about successful programs and structures that can have broad impact on building stronger entrepreneurial communities.”

Source: City of Knoxville

Beth Papanek hopes to earn PhD, exit her first startup in 2016

Tom Ballard, Pershing Yoakley & Associates, P.C.’s Director of Innovation and Entrepreneurial Initiatives, published an article on Teknovation.biz about Beth Papanek, who is scheduled to deliver a Power Pitch at Startup Day 2014.

By the middle of 2016, Papanek hopes to achieve two major milestones – earn her doctorate from the University of Tennessee and exit her first start-up.

The Illinois native is one of the 80 students who are part of the Bredesen Center for Interdisciplinary Research and Graduate Education, a joint initiative of UT and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) focused on attracting the nation’s brightest doctoral students in energy science and engineering.

Papanek is in the second class admitted, having earned both her Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees at the University of Illinois in Urbana/Champaign. A strong interest in UT’s work in biofuels led her to apply for and be accepted into the new program.

Papanek says she’s “so privileged” to be able to work as a graduate student with some of the world’s leading scientists at ORNL. “I’m so connected,” she says, adding that her experiences are “amazing for career development.”

When the concept was still on the drawing board, the planners hoped that some fraction of the Bredesen Center students would pursue entrepreneurship, working with scientists at either UT or ORNL to commercialize the technologies on which they did their research.

“The Bredesen Center encourages us to pursue interests in either entrepreneurship or policy,” Papanek explained. The entrepreneurial track was a natural for her, having been part of a student team at Illinois working on two technologies from the Mayo Clinic.

“That started it (the entrepreneurial bug),” Papanek says. Since arriving here 18 months ago, the interest has only grown, thanks to involvement with many of the region’s entrepreneurial support organizations and ORNL’s Partnerships Directorate.

Papanek is focused on her research interest in bioenergy and a process called sonoporation that uses ultrasonic sound frequencies to modify the permeability of cells. The result of the process is the creation of genetically-mutated microorganisms that help optimize the process of making ethanol.

Those who attended last year’s “Start-up Day” in Knoxville saw Papanek present a concept for a company that she was exploring. It is named SonOPore for the ORNL technology on which it is built. This year, Papanek will present a Power Pitch for a new company she is exploring, Nanofermentation.

Source: Tom Ballard, Teknovation.biz