Oak Ridge startup competes in this year’s “2014 $1M Global Action Challenge” in Nashville

Oak Ridge startup Clodico competed in this week’s “2014 $1M Global Action Challenge” in Nashville at its Global Action Summit.

The competition is billed as an “investment opportunity to identify breakthrough prototypes, technologies or early stage ventures that hold promise for transformative impact on health and food and are scalable business enterprises.”

To read the full story from Teknovation.biz, click here.

Source: Tom Ballard, Teknovation.biz

Knoxville well represented at inaugural “Reverse Pitch”

Knoxville and Northeast Tennessee were well represented at Launch Tennessee’s inaugural “Reverse Pitch” event last week in Chattanooga.

Two Knoxville companies – AC Entertainment, in conjunction with Aloompa, and DeRoyal – were two of the nine companies that “pitched” specific needs they hoped the more than 150 attending entrepreneurs and technologists would be interested in addressing.

The term “Reverse Pitch” refers to the fact that established companies are presenting needs, not the typical “pitch” where start-ups are presenting their ideas to potential customers and investors.

In kicking-off the program, Launch Tennessee’s Charlie Brock noted that the event was the state’s first “Reverse Pitch.”

A number of Knoxville entrepreneurs and technologists were in the audience, including Jim Biggs and Jonathan Sexton of the Knoxville Entrepreneur Center, DMG Bluegill’s Parker Frost, Survature’s Jian Huang and Audio Hand’s Haseeb Qureshi, to name a few.

Read the full story here.

Source: Tom Ballard, Teknovation.biz

Street Jelly competing in Chase Bank’s “Mission Main Street” program

Street Jelly’s Frank Podlaha has entered Chase Bank’s “Mission Main Street” grant program.

The Knoxville-based start-up is competing to be one of 20 small businesses to receive $150,000 each from the $3 million pool. The 20 grants will be awarded in January.

Read the full story here.

Source: Tom Ballard, Teknovation.biz

Beth Papanek hopes to earn PhD, exit her first startup in 2016

Tom Ballard, Pershing Yoakley & Associates, P.C.’s Director of Innovation and Entrepreneurial Initiatives, published an article on Teknovation.biz about Beth Papanek, who is scheduled to deliver a Power Pitch at Startup Day 2014.

By the middle of 2016, Papanek hopes to achieve two major milestones – earn her doctorate from the University of Tennessee and exit her first start-up.

The Illinois native is one of the 80 students who are part of the Bredesen Center for Interdisciplinary Research and Graduate Education, a joint initiative of UT and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) focused on attracting the nation’s brightest doctoral students in energy science and engineering.

Papanek is in the second class admitted, having earned both her Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees at the University of Illinois in Urbana/Champaign. A strong interest in UT’s work in biofuels led her to apply for and be accepted into the new program.

Papanek says she’s “so privileged” to be able to work as a graduate student with some of the world’s leading scientists at ORNL. “I’m so connected,” she says, adding that her experiences are “amazing for career development.”

When the concept was still on the drawing board, the planners hoped that some fraction of the Bredesen Center students would pursue entrepreneurship, working with scientists at either UT or ORNL to commercialize the technologies on which they did their research.

“The Bredesen Center encourages us to pursue interests in either entrepreneurship or policy,” Papanek explained. The entrepreneurial track was a natural for her, having been part of a student team at Illinois working on two technologies from the Mayo Clinic.

“That started it (the entrepreneurial bug),” Papanek says. Since arriving here 18 months ago, the interest has only grown, thanks to involvement with many of the region’s entrepreneurial support organizations and ORNL’s Partnerships Directorate.

Papanek is focused on her research interest in bioenergy and a process called sonoporation that uses ultrasonic sound frequencies to modify the permeability of cells. The result of the process is the creation of genetically-mutated microorganisms that help optimize the process of making ethanol.

Those who attended last year’s “Start-up Day” in Knoxville saw Papanek present a concept for a company that she was exploring. It is named SonOPore for the ORNL technology on which it is built. This year, Papanek will present a Power Pitch for a new company she is exploring, Nanofermentation.

Source: Tom Ballard, Teknovation.biz